Top Stories

Tulsa Police

Tulsa County DA Not Charging Officers Who Shot Mentally Ill Man Armed With Knives

Officers who shot and killed a mentally ill man at a north Tulsa convenience store in June will not face criminal charges. Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler said his office found no criminal wrongdoing by Tulsa Police Officer Donnie Johnson or Tulsa County Sheriff's Deputies William Ramsey and Brandon Walker. The officers encountered 29-year-old Joshua Barre on June 9 while he was walking along a street carrying two large knives. They tried to convince Barre to drop the knives,...

Read More

Corporation Commission Approves Emergency Rules for Expanded Long Lateral Drilling

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission has passed emergency rules for expanded long-lateral drilling. Previously, horizontal oil and gas wells more than a mile long were only allowed in shale formations. Corporation commission spokesman Matt Skinner said that changes Friday. "The legislature has made a law — and the governor signed it — to say, 'Well, you can go anywhere,'" Skinner said. "So, it's up to the commission, then, to adopt rules to govern that law. We don't make law; we only make the...

Read More

Navy Navigation Errors May Have Killed More Troops Than Afghanistan So Far in 2017

A heartsick surface Navy is vowing to find answers after a series of incidents that could make the peacetime Western Pacific deadlier for U.S. troops this year than Afghanistan. The Navy began, as it often does, with accountability: On Wednesday, it fired the three-star admiral whose command in the Western Pacific suffered at least four big accidents this year, two of which may have killed a combined 17 sailors. An officer aboard the destroyer USS Stethem also was lost overboard near the...

Read More

U.N. Panel Urges U.S. Government To Reject Racial Hatred And Violence

The United Nations' Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has urged the U.S. government to reject racist speech and ideology and criticized its "failure at the highest political level" to unequivocally condemn the racist violence at Charlottesville, Va., earlier this month. The statement released online and apparently written last week, does not mention President Trump by name. But it's clearly a response to Trump's mixed messages in the wake of the deadly violence in...

Read More

StudioTulsa

(Note: This show first aired back in January.) We speak with Frances McCall Rosenbluth, a Professor of Political Science at Yale University and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is the co-author of a new book called "Forged Through Fire: War, Peace, and the Democratic Bargain," which she discusses with us. As was noted in a starred review of this book by Kirkus, this is a "sometimes-counterintuitive but always fascinating interrogation of the history and uses of war....

(Note: This show first aired back in February.) On this edition of our show, a discussion with Sue Klebold, whose 17-year-old son, Dylan, was of course one of the two teenage boys who committed suicide ­after their murderous attack on Colorado's Columbine High School in 1999. Klebold has a new book out about this incident -- and more to the point, about the behaviors that she did and did not see in her son in the months and years leading up to that terrible April day.

On this installment of ST Medical Monday, an interesting conversation with Dr. Justin Feinstein, who's a clinical neuropsychologist at Tulsa's Laureate Institute for Brain Research (or LIBR) as well as an assistant professor of psychology in TU's Oxley College of Health Sciences. Dr. Feinstein also directors the "Float Clinic" at LIBR, which studies how and why floating in a foot or so of water -- to which has been added more than a ton of Epsom Salt -- can aid those who suffer from acute stress, high-level anxiety, PTSD, and similar afflictions.

On this edition of ST, we welcome the Tulsa-based author Jennifer Latham back to our show. Her recently published YA novel, "Dreamland Burning," is a suspenseful narrative about the Tulsa Race Riot. As was noted of this book in an appreciative review from School Library Journal: "Latham follows up 'Scarlett Undercover' with a rich work that links past and present in a tale that explores racial prejudice. After the remains of a skeleton are found in her Tulsa, OK, backyard, 17-year-old Rowan Chase becomes consumed with finding out the story behind the death.

On this edition of ST, after the tornado activity we saw here in Tulsa earlier this month, we're talking about what local small businesses can do to protect themselves from damage caused by flooding, storms, tornadoes, and other natural disasters. Our guest is Dave Hall, Chair of the Disaster Resistant Business Council, which is a part of the Disaster Resilience Network (formerly known as Tulsa Partners).

More StudioTulsa

Abstaining from sexual activity is a sure-fire way to prevent pregnancy and avoid sexually transmitted diseases. But programs advocating abstinence often fail to prevent young people from having sex, researchers write in the September issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Such programs, sometimes referred to as "abstinence-only-until-marriage" programs, typically advocate monogamous, heterosexual marriage as the only appropriate context for sexual intercourse and as the only certain way to avoid unwanted pregnancies and sexually-transmitted diseases.

President Trump led an incendiary rally at which he ripped at cultural divides, played to white grievance, defended himself by stretching the truth or leaving out key facts, attacked members of his own party and the media, played the victim and threatened apocalyptic political consequences — all the while doing so by ignoring political norms and sensitivities.

The only thing that's surprising is if you're surprised by it.

The U.S. State Department has released an updated travel advisory for Mexico, expanding its warnings specifically about the regions home to some of the country's most popular tourist destinations.

The agency cautioned U.S. citizens that homicide rates are on the rise in areas such as the states of Quintana Roo, which includes Cancun, and Baja California Sur, which is home to Los Cabos.

Sometimes musicians write a song for a cause. Sometimes, the cause chooses the song.

You can swipe. You can scroll. But New Yorkers will no longer be able to flip through The Village Voice. This week, the legendary alternative weekly announced that it's ending its free paper version.

In a press release distributed Tuesday, the publication said it plans to maintain its digital platform and continue to host events, but will no longer be printing paper copies. The Voice had been in print for more than six decades, and recently had a distribution of some 120,000 copies each week.

As the debate rages over what role Confederate monuments do — and should — play in commemorating U.S. history, Jennifer Allen says we can learn a lot from Germany.

Allen is an assistant professor of German history at Yale University, and she specializes in something called memory politics.

At a campaign rally in Phoenix on Tuesday, President Trump made news by slamming Republican senators, praising controversial former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio and blasting the news media.

He also defended his initial, controversial remarks on recent violent protests in Charlottesville, Va. But in doing so, he left out the parts of the remarks that inflamed people's tempers the most, like his comment that there was violence "on many sides."

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

Danish police have identified remains that washed ashore in Copenhagen as those of Kim Wall, the Swedish journalist who died aboard inventor Peter Madsen's personal submarine earlier this month. Authorities announced Wednesday that they had matched Wall's DNA with a female torso, which was found without a head, legs or arms.

Pages