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Laurie Avocado

Oklahoma Marijuana Proponents File Lawsuits Over Strict New Rules

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Civil lawsuits have been filed in two Oklahoma counties accusing state health officials of improperly imposing strict rules on the state's recently approved medical marijuana industry. Separate lawsuits were filed Friday in Cleveland and Oklahoma counties over the policies that were adopted this week by the State Board of Health and then quickly approved by Republican Gov. Mary Fallin. The board of Fallin appointees voted 5-4 on Tuesday to approve a ban on the sale of...

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Oklahoma Medicaid Approved for Drug Pricing Experiment

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has approved Oklahoma's Medicaid program for a first-in-the-nation drug pricing experiment that supporters say could save taxpayer dollars and provide patients with the most effective medications for their ailments. Under the "value-based purchasing" program approved in late June, the state and a pharmaceutical company would agree to a set payment if its medication works as advertised, but only a fraction of that if...

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The Ginsburg Rule: False Advertising By The GOP

With President Trump's nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court, GOP senators are singing a constant refrain in anticipation of confirmation hearings. They point to something they call "the Ginsburg rule," contending that at her confirmation hearing, liberal nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg established a precedent for refusing to answer questions about issues before the Supreme Court. But that, it turns out, is not really true. "The woman decides" It is true that Ginsburg, in her...

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Summer Rolls In...On The Next All This Jazz

Listen for the next All This Jazz, starting at 9pm on Saturday the 14th, right here on KWGS / Public Radio Tulsa. Our program's third-hour theme, running in the 11pm-to-midnight hour, will be Summer Tunes , and so we'll dig jazz takes on such familiar themes as "Summertime" and "The Things We Did Last Summer" -- along with wonderful songs like Horace Silver's "Summer in Central Park" and Marc Johnson's "Summer Running." And elsewhere in our show, we'll enjoy the music of Dave Holland, Jane...

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StudioTulsa

Photo by Valery Lyman

On this edition of ST, we listen back to an interview that first aired in May with the photographer and filmmaker Valery Lyman, who has a striking show on view at Living Arts in downtown Tulsa called "Breaking Ground." This show -- which actually closes today, the 12th -- aims to travel, per the Living Arts website, "through the American psyche and landscape....

(Please note: This interview originally aired back in February.) Lots of mythology surrounding the Old West, of course, and lots of rich history, too. On this program, we explore both. Our guest is Tom Clavin, the popular historian whose latest book is "Dodge City: Wyatt Earp, Bat Masterson, and the Wickedest Town in the American West." As was noted of this book by the Houston Press: "Thorough, compelling, and entertaining.... Clavin sprinkles in fascinating tidbits about life and culture in the Old West....

(Note: This interview originally aired back in April.) Our guest is Marc Perrusquia, a journalist with the Memphis Commercial Appeal newspaper, where he's worked for the past three decades. Perrusquia has a new book out, a very compelling work of history called "A Spy in Canaan: How the FBI Used a Famous Photographer to Infiltrate the Civil Rights Movement." As was noted of this book by Kirkus Reviews: "The story of an African-American photographer who spent 18 years feeding information to the FBI....

What's it like to be an "ER doc" in America today? And how has that job changed in recent decades? Paul Seward is our guest. Now retired, he was a physician for nearly fifty years, and he spent most of those years working in emergency rooms. He's just published a memoir, "Patient Care: Death and Life in the Emergency Room." As was noted of this volume by Booklist: "Seward's engrossing and approachable memoir plunges readers into the unpredictable life of an emergency-room physician.... His humble recollections are sad yet joyful, moving yet lighthearted.

Our guest on ST is Dr. Deborah Gist, the Superintendent of Tulsa Public Schools, who's worked in public education for nearly three decades at the school, district, and state levels (in Florida, Texas, Rhode Island, and elsewhere). Dr. Gist grew up in Tulsa -- and attended Tulsa Public Schools -- before earning degrees at the University of Oklahoma, the University of South Florida, Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and the University of Pennsylvania. In 2015, she returned to Tulsa to begin her current post as TPS Superintendent.

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When it comes to immigration policy, American opinions often break down along party lines, with most Republicans supporting President Trump, and Democrats vigorously opposed.

But according to a new NPR-Ipsos poll, there's an even better predictor of how you feel about immigration: where you get your TV news.

Can't cool off this summer? Heat waves can slow us down in ways we may not realize.

New research suggests heat stress can muddle our thinking, making simple math a little harder to do.

Every day, Dr. Walter Koroshetz, 65, takes a pill as part of his effort to help keep his brain healthy and sharp.

The pill is his blood pressure medication. And Koroshetz, who directs the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, says controlling high blood pressure helps him reduce his risk of dementia.

He also keeps his blood pressure down by exercising, and paying attention to his weight and diet. "I'm a believer," he says.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As the #MeToo movement has spread, more and more women - and some men - have been coming forward from more and more workplaces and other institutions to share their stories and to demand change.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we are going to hear more about the creative life of Robin Williams. He is the subject of a new HBO documentary airing tomorrow night called "Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 6:36 p.m. ET

Protests in Chicago escalated on Saturday night, becoming a tense clash between demonstrators and police over the fatal shooting of a man on the city's South Side.

On Sunday, police released a 30-second video clip from an officer's body-worn an camera showing a black man shot by Chicago police had a gun in a holster at his hip. According to The Associated Press, the man was "running away and reaching toward his waist when he was shot multiple times."

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